About

About

About

About

About

REGARDING OUR COALITION

REGARDING OUR COALITION

REGARDING OUR COALITION

REGARDING OUR COALITION

REGARDING OUR COALITION

UNIFOR    CUPE    CPSC
UNIFOR    CUPE    CPSC
UNIFOR    CUPE    CPSC
UNIFOR    CUPE    CPSC

About Unifor

About Unifor

About Unifor

About Unifor

About Unifor

Unifor is a Canada-wide union representing more than 315,000 members across the country. In Quebec, it has nearly 55,000 members and is affiliated with the province’s largest central labour body, the Quebec Federation of Labour (QFL). Unifor is the largest private-sector union in both Canada and Quebec.

Unifor is dedicated to defending the rights of all working people. It fights for equality and social justice both at home and abroad and works to bring about progressive change with a view to building a better future.

Unifor is a Canada-wide union representing more than 315,000 members across the country. In Quebec, it has nearly 55,000 members and is affiliated with the province’s largest central labour body, the Quebec Federation of Labour (QFL). Unifor is the largest private-sector union in both Canada and Quebec.

Unifor is dedicated to defending the rights of all working people. It fights for equality and social justice both at home and abroad and works to bring about progressive change with a view to building a better future.

Unifor is a Canada-wide union representing more than 315,000 members across the country. In Quebec, it has nearly 55,000 members and is affiliated with the province’s largest central labour body, the Quebec Federation of Labour (QFL). Unifor is the largest private-sector union in both Canada and Quebec.

Unifor is dedicated to defending the rights of all working people. It fights for equality and social justice both at home and abroad and works to bring about progressive change with a view to building a better future.

Unifor is a Canada-wide union representing more than 315,000 members across the country. In Quebec, it has nearly 55,000 members and is affiliated with the province’s largest central labour body, the Quebec Federation of Labour (QFL). Unifor is the largest private-sector union in both Canada and Quebec.

Unifor is dedicated to defending the rights of all working people. It fights for equality and social justice both at home and abroad and works to bring about progressive change with a view to building a better future.

Unifor is a Canada-wide union representing more than 315,000 members across the country. In Quebec, it has nearly 55,000 members and is affiliated with the province’s largest central labour body, the Quebec Federation of Labour (QFL). Unifor is the largest private-sector union in both Canada and Quebec.

Unifor is dedicated to defending the rights of all working people. It fights for equality and social justice both at home and abroad and works to bring about progressive change with a view to building a better future.

Unifor in the telecom sector

Unifor in the telecom sector

Unifor in the telecom sector

Unifor in the telecom sector

Unifor in the telecom sector

In Quebec alone, Unifor represents over 8,100 members working in the telecommunications sector, mainly as technicians and clerical employees in the following companies:

> Expertech / Network Installations
> Bell Canada
> Bell Technical Solutions (BTS)
> Télébec
> Bell I.C.T. (information and communication technologies)
> Bell Mobility

For decades, Unifor has been actively engaged in the political and public spheres in order to defend its members and preserve democratic access to information technologies. Over the years, Unifor has launched various mobilization campaigns and presented numerous briefs to relevant industry bodies such as the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC).

In Quebec alone, Unifor represents over 8,100 members working in the telecommunications sector, mainly as technicians and clerical employees in the following companies:

> Expertech / Network Installations
> Bell Canada
> Bell Technical Solutions (BTS)
> Télébec
> Bell I.C.T. (information and communication technologies)
> Bell Mobility

For decades, Unifor has been actively engaged in the political and public spheres in order to defend its members and preserve democratic access to information technologies. Over the years, Unifor has launched various mobilization campaigns and presented numerous briefs to relevant industry bodies such as the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC).

In Quebec alone, Unifor represents over 8,100 members working in the telecommunications sector, mainly as technicians and clerical employees in the following companies:

> Expertech / Network Installations
> Bell Canada
> Bell Technical Solutions (BTS)
> Télébec
> Bell I.C.T. (information and communication technologies)
> Bell Mobility

For decades, Unifor has been actively engaged in the political and public spheres in order to defend its members and preserve democratic access to information technologies. Over the years, Unifor has launched various mobilization campaigns and presented numerous briefs to relevant industry bodies such as the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC).

In Quebec alone, Unifor represents over 8,100 members working in the telecommunications sector, mainly as technicians and clerical employees in the following companies:

> Expertech / Network Installations
> Bell Canada
> Bell Technical Solutions (BTS)
> Télébec
> Bell I.C.T. (information and communication technologies)
> Bell Mobility

For decades, Unifor has been actively engaged in the political and public spheres in order to defend its members and preserve democratic access to information technologies. Over the years, Unifor has launched various mobilization campaigns and presented numerous briefs to relevant industry bodies such as the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC).

In Quebec alone, Unifor represents over 8,100 members working in the telecommunications sector, mainly as technicians and clerical employees in the following companies:

> Expertech / Network Installations
> Bell Canada
> Bell Technical Solutions (BTS)
> Télébec
> Bell I.C.T. (information and communication technologies)
> Bell Mobility

For decades, Unifor has been actively engaged in the political and public spheres in order to defend its members and preserve democratic access to information technologies. Over the years, Unifor has launched various mobilization campaigns and presented numerous briefs to relevant industry bodies such as the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC).

Unifor's history

Unifor's history

Unifor's history

Unifor's history

Unifor's history

Unifor was officially created in 2013 by a merger of the Canadian Auto Workers union (CAW) and the Communications, Energy and Paperworkers Union of Canada (CEP), two of Canada and Quebec’s largest private-sector unions. Today, Unifor is present in over 20 sectors of the Canadian economy, including aerospace, aluminium, forestry, automobile, telecommunications, media, etc.

Unifor was officially created in 2013 by a merger of the Canadian Auto Workers union (CAW) and the Communications, Energy and Paperworkers Union of Canada (CEP), two of Canada and Quebec’s largest private-sector unions. Today, Unifor is present in over 20 sectors of the Canadian economy, including aerospace, aluminium, forestry, automobile, telecommunications, media, etc.

Unifor was officially created in 2013 by a merger of the Canadian Auto Workers union (CAW) and the Communications, Energy and Paperworkers Union of Canada (CEP), two of Canada and Quebec’s largest private-sector unions. Today, Unifor is present in over 20 sectors of the Canadian economy, including aerospace, aluminium, forestry, automobile, telecommunications, media, etc.

Unifor was officially created in 2013 by a merger of the Canadian Auto Workers union (CAW) and the Communications, Energy and Paperworkers Union of Canada (CEP), two of Canada and Quebec’s largest private-sector unions. Today, Unifor is present in over 20 sectors of the Canadian economy, including aerospace, aluminium, forestry, automobile, telecommunications, media, etc.

Unifor was officially created in 2013 by a merger of the Canadian Auto Workers union (CAW) and the Communications, Energy and Paperworkers Union of Canada (CEP), two of Canada and Quebec’s largest private-sector unions. Today, Unifor is present in over 20 sectors of the Canadian economy, including aerospace, aluminium, forestry, automobile, telecommunications, media, etc.

CUPE

CUPE

CUPE

CUPE

CUPE

The Canadian Union of Public Employees is the largest union in Canada and Quebec. It is affiliated with the Canadian Labour Congress (CLC) and the Quebec Federation of Labour (QFL). CUPE was founded in 1963 by a merger of the National Union of Public Service Employees and the National Union of Public Employees.

CUPE has over 700,000 members across Canada. Through their respective local unions, these members share substantial expertise in fighting against privatization and contracting out and for health and safety, collective bargaining, etc., while preserving an autonomy that promotes an active local union life. With close to 119,300 members in Quebec, CUPE has established itself over the course of successive negotiations as an essential and universally respected interlocutor.

The Canadian Union of Public Employees is the largest union in Canada and Quebec. It is affiliated with the Canadian Labour Congress (CLC) and the Quebec Federation of Labour (QFL). CUPE was founded in 1963 by a merger of the National Union of Public Service Employees and the National Union of Public Employees.

CUPE has over 700,000 members across Canada. Through their respective local unions, these members share substantial expertise in fighting against privatization and contracting out and for health and safety, collective bargaining, etc., while preserving an autonomy that promotes an active local union life. With close to 119,300 members in Quebec, CUPE has established itself over the course of successive negotiations as an essential and universally respected interlocutor.

The Canadian Union of Public Employees is the largest union in Canada and Quebec. It is affiliated with the Canadian Labour Congress (CLC) and the Quebec Federation of Labour (QFL). CUPE was founded in 1963 by a merger of the National Union of Public Service Employees and the National Union of Public Employees.

CUPE has over 700,000 members across Canada. Through their respective local unions, these members share substantial expertise in fighting against privatization and contracting out and for health and safety, collective bargaining, etc., while preserving an autonomy that promotes an active local union life. With close to 119,300 members in Quebec, CUPE has established itself over the course of successive negotiations as an essential and universally respected interlocutor.

The Canadian Union of Public Employees is the largest union in Canada and Quebec. It is affiliated with the Canadian Labour Congress (CLC) and the Quebec Federation of Labour (QFL). CUPE was founded in 1963 by a merger of the National Union of Public Service Employees and the National Union of Public Employees.

CUPE has over 700,000 members across Canada. Through their respective local unions, these members share substantial expertise in fighting against privatization and contracting out and for health and safety, collective bargaining, etc., while preserving an autonomy that promotes an active local union life. With close to 119,300 members in Quebec, CUPE has established itself over the course of successive negotiations as an essential and universally respected interlocutor.

The Canadian Union of Public Employees is the largest union in Canada and Quebec. It is affiliated with the Canadian Labour Congress (CLC) and the Quebec Federation of Labour (QFL). CUPE was founded in 1963 by a merger of the National Union of Public Service Employees and the National Union of Public Employees.

CUPE has over 700,000 members across Canada. Through their respective local unions, these members share substantial expertise in fighting against privatization and contracting out and for health and safety, collective bargaining, etc., while preserving an autonomy that promotes an active local union life. With close to 119,300 members in Quebec, CUPE has established itself over the course of successive negotiations as an essential and universally respected interlocutor.

Our history in Quebec

Our history in Quebec

Our history in Quebec

Our history in Quebec

Our history in Quebec

From just a few hundred members at the time of its founding in 1963, CUPE has grown steadily over the decades. By early 2019, CUPE had nearly 119,300 members in Quebec, distributed across 502 local unions, both large and small.

Delegates from local unions come together every two years for the National Convention, where they set priorities and directions, policies to be developed and actions to be taken, with a focus on the specific situation of Quebec.

CUPE is a full-service union offering the complete range of services of a large labour federation.

From just a few hundred members at the time of its founding in 1963, CUPE has grown steadily over the decades. By early 2019, CUPE had nearly 119,300 members in Quebec, distributed across 502 local unions, both large and small.

Delegates from local unions come together every two years for the National Convention, where they set priorities and directions, policies to be developed and actions to be taken, with a focus on the specific situation of Quebec.

CUPE is a full-service union offering the complete range of services of a large labour federation.

From just a few hundred members at the time of its founding in 1963, CUPE has grown steadily over the decades. By early 2019, CUPE had nearly 119,300 members in Quebec, distributed across 502 local unions, both large and small.

Delegates from local unions come together every two years for the National Convention, where they set priorities and directions, policies to be developed and actions to be taken, with a focus on the specific situation of Quebec.

CUPE is a full-service union offering the complete range of services of a large labour federation.

From just a few hundred members at the time of its founding in 1963, CUPE has grown steadily over the decades. By early 2019, CUPE had nearly 119,300 members in Quebec, distributed across 502 local unions, both large and small.

Delegates from local unions come together every two years for the National Convention, where they set priorities and directions, policies to be developed and actions to be taken, with a focus on the specific situation of Quebec.

CUPE is a full-service union offering the complete range of services of a large labour federation.

From just a few hundred members at the time of its founding in 1963, CUPE has grown steadily over the decades. By early 2019, CUPE had nearly 119,300 members in Quebec, distributed across 502 local unions, both large and small.

Delegates from local unions come together every two years for the National Convention, where they set priorities and directions, policies to be developed and actions to be taken, with a focus on the specific situation of Quebec.

CUPE is a full-service union offering the complete range of services of a large labour federation.

CPSC

CPSC

CPSC

CPSC

CPSC

Through Quebec’s provincial communications council (PCSC) and its 7,181 members, CUPE is a major force in both television (TVA Group, NFB, RNC Media, Shaw Media (Global)), radio (CIMF - Gatineau, CKOB - Trois-Rivières), telecommunications (Telus Quebec, Videotron, Cogeco), film and post-production (Covitec, SETTE), and print media (Journal de Québec).

The CPSC intervenes in numerous public forums focused on communications, including the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), to which it has submitted dozens of briefs over the past 20 years.

The CPSC’s interventions place a strong emphasis on the public interest, which is fully consistent with the commitment to ensure respect for workers in the various fields that make up the communications sector.

Through Quebec’s provincial communications council (PCSC) and its 7,181 members, CUPE is a major force in both television (TVA Group, NFB, RNC Media, Shaw Media (Global)), radio (CIMF - Gatineau, CKOB - Trois-Rivières), telecommunications (Telus Quebec, Videotron, Cogeco), film and post-production (Covitec, SETTE), and print media (Journal de Québec).

The CPSC intervenes in numerous public forums focused on communications, including the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), to which it has submitted dozens of briefs over the past 20 years.

The CPSC’s interventions place a strong emphasis on the public interest, which is fully consistent with the commitment to ensure respect for workers in the various fields that make up the communications sector.

Through Quebec’s provincial communications council (PCSC) and its 7,181 members, CUPE is a major force in both television (TVA Group, NFB, RNC Media, Shaw Media (Global)), radio (CIMF - Gatineau, CKOB - Trois-Rivières), telecommunications (Telus Quebec, Videotron, Cogeco), film and post-production (Covitec, SETTE), and print media (Journal de Québec).

The CPSC intervenes in numerous public forums focused on communications, including the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), to which it has submitted dozens of briefs over the past 20 years.

The CPSC’s interventions place a strong emphasis on the public interest, which is fully consistent with the commitment to ensure respect for workers in the various fields that make up the communications sector.

Through Quebec’s provincial communications council (PCSC) and its 7,181 members, CUPE is a major force in both television (TVA Group, NFB, RNC Media, Shaw Media (Global)), radio (CIMF - Gatineau, CKOB - Trois-Rivières), telecommunications (Telus Quebec, Videotron, Cogeco), film and post-production (Covitec, SETTE), and print media (Journal de Québec).

The CPSC intervenes in numerous public forums focused on communications, including the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), to which it has submitted dozens of briefs over the past 20 years.

The CPSC’s interventions place a strong emphasis on the public interest, which is fully consistent with the commitment to ensure respect for workers in the various fields that make up the communications sector.

Through Quebec’s provincial communications council (PCSC) and its 7,181 members, CUPE is a major force in both television (TVA Group, NFB, RNC Media, Shaw Media (Global)), radio (CIMF - Gatineau, CKOB - Trois-Rivières), telecommunications (Telus Quebec, Videotron, Cogeco), film and post-production (Covitec, SETTE), and print media (Journal de Québec).

The CPSC intervenes in numerous public forums focused on communications, including the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC), to which it has submitted dozens of briefs over the past 20 years.

The CPSC’s interventions place a strong emphasis on the public interest, which is fully consistent with the commitment to ensure respect for workers in the various fields that make up the communications sector.

MONTREAL HEAD OFFICE
565 Boulevard Crémazie Est #7100
Montreal, QC, H2M 2V9
(514) 384-9681
MONTREAL HEAD OFFICE
565 Boulevard Crémazie Est #7100
Montreal, QC, H2M 2V9
(514) 384-9681
MONTREAL HEAD OFFICE
565 Boulevard Crémazie Est #7100
Montreal, QC, H2M 2V9
(514) 384-9681
MONTREAL HEAD OFFICE
565 Boulevard Crémazie Est #7100
Montreal, QC, H2M 2V9
(514) 384-9681
MONTREAL HEAD OFFICE
565 Boulevard Crémazie Est #7100
Montreal, QC, H2M 2V9
(514) 384-9681
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© 2021 — Canadian Union of Public Employees
© 2021 — Canadian Union of Public Employees
© 2021 — Canadian Union of Public Employees
© 2021 — Canadian Union of Public Employees
© 2021 — Canadian Union of Public Employees