Our Telecoms, Our Jobs.

Our Telecoms, Our Jobs.

Our Telecoms,
Our Jobs.

Our Telecoms,
Our Jobs.

Our Telecoms, Our Jobs.

OFFSHORED JOBS, WEAKER SECURITY.

OFFSHORED JOBS, WEAKER SECURITY.

OFFSHORED JOBS,
WEAKER SECURITY.

OFFSHORED JOBS,
WEAKER SECURITY.

OFFSHORED JOBS,
WEAKER SECURITY.

Canadian telecoms:
A vehicle for recovery or precarity?

Canadian telecoms:
A vehicle for recovery or precarity?

Canadian telecoms:
A vehicle for recovery or precarity?

Canadian telecoms:
A vehicle for recovery or precarity?

Canadian telecoms:
A vehicle for recovery or precarity?

Did you know that Canadian telecommunication companies routinely use call centres and workers located overseas? Despite the fact that Canada’s biggest telecoms receive generous subsidies and other protections from the federal government, some of these companies have transferred tens of thousands of jobs outside the country. This is not acceptable!

If you are one of the 84% of respondents to our survey who are concerned about the offshoring of these jobs or the 92% who believe that telcos play a key role in our local economies, sign the letter below and tell the ministers responsible that these practices have to stop!

Did you know that Canadian telecommunication companies routinely use call centres and workers located overseas? Despite the fact that Canada’s biggest telecoms receive generous subsidies and other protections from the federal government, some of these companies have transferred tens of thousands of jobs outside the country. This is not acceptable!

If you are one of the 84% of respondents to our survey who are concerned about the offshoring of these jobs or the 92% who believe that telcos play a key role in our local economies, sign the letter below and tell the ministers responsible that these practices have to stop!

Did you know that Canadian telecommunication companies routinely use call centres and workers located overseas? Despite the fact that Canada’s biggest telecoms receive generous subsidies and other protections from the federal government, some of these companies have transferred tens of thousands of jobs outside the country. This is not acceptable!

If you are one of the 84% of respondents to our survey who are concerned about the offshoring of these jobs or the 92% who believe that telcos play a key role in our local economies, sign the letter below and tell the ministers responsible that these practices have to stop!

Did you know that Canadian telecommunication companies routinely use call centres and workers located overseas? Despite the fact that Canada’s biggest telecoms receive generous subsidies and other protections from the federal government, some of these companies have transferred tens of thousands of jobs outside the country. This is not acceptable!

If you are one of the 84% of respondents to our survey who are concerned about the offshoring of these jobs or the 92% who believe that telcos play a key role in our local economies, sign the letter below and tell the ministers responsible that these practices have to stop!

Did you know that Canadian telecommunication companies routinely use call centres and workers located overseas? Despite the fact that Canada’s biggest telecoms receive generous subsidies and other protections from the federal government, some of these companies have transferred tens of thousands of jobs outside the country. This is not acceptable!

If you are one of the 84% of respondents to our survey who are concerned about the offshoring of these jobs or the 92% who believe that telcos play a key role in our local economies, sign the letter below and tell the ministers responsible that these practices have to stop!

Is your privacy protected?

Is your privacy protected?

Is your privacy protected?

Is your privacy protected??

Is your privacy protected?

In Canada, over 30 million people have had their personal or financial data breached. Despite this, our large telecom companies continue to outsource jobs to countries that do not offer the same level of data and privacy protection. So instead of keeping and protecting your data here, they are asking you to outsource your personal information to subcontractors located overseas. Does that seem normal to you?

In Canada, over 30 million people have had their personal or financial data breached. Despite this, our large telecom companies continue to outsource jobs to countries that do not offer the same level of data and privacy protection. So instead of keeping and protecting your data here, they are asking you to outsource your personal information to subcontractors located overseas. Does that seem normal to you?

In Canada, over 30 million people have had their personal or financial data breached. Despite this, our large telecom companies continue to outsource jobs to countries that do not offer the same level of data and privacy protection. So instead of keeping and protecting your data here, they are asking you to outsource your personal information to subcontractors located overseas. Does that seem normal to you?

In Canada, over 30 million people have had their personal or financial data breached. Despite this, our large telecom companies continue to outsource jobs to countries that do not offer the same level of data and privacy protection. So instead of keeping and protecting your data here, they are asking you to outsource your personal information to subcontractors located overseas. Does that seem normal to you?

In Canada, over 30 million people have had their personal or financial data breached. Despite this, our large telecom companies continue to outsource jobs to countries that do not offer the same level of data and privacy protection. So instead of keeping and protecting your data here, they are asking you to outsource your personal information to subcontractors located overseas. Does that seem normal to you?

Agent téléphonique

An unequal balance of power

An unequal balance of power

An unequal balance of power

An unequal balance of power

An unequal balance of power

By allowing the offshoring of jobs, the government favours company management at the expense of workers, notably due to the absence of anti-scab provisions in the Canada Labour Code. Since telecom companies are under federal jurisdiction, labour relations in this industry are governed by this Labour Code. The result is an unequal balance of power in this economic sector, since employers can transfer work overseas during a strike or lockout with no possibility for the unions to oppose or challenge this practice. We have to restore the balance of power by prohibiting the use of scabs!

By allowing the offshoring of jobs, the government favours company management at the expense of workers, notably due to the absence of anti-scab provisions in the Canada Labour Code. Since telecom companies are under federal jurisdiction, labour relations in this industry are governed by this Labour Code. The result is an unequal balance of power in this economic sector, since employers can transfer work overseas during a strike or lockout with no possibility for the unions to oppose or challenge this practice. We have to restore the balance of power by prohibiting the use of scabs!!

By allowing the offshoring of jobs, the government favours company management at the expense of workers, notably due to the absence of anti-scab provisions in the Canada Labour Code. Since telecom companies are under federal jurisdiction, labour relations in this industry are governed by this Labour Code. The result is an unequal balance of power in this economic sector, since employers can transfer work overseas during a strike or lockout with no possibility for the unions to oppose or challenge this practice. We have to restore the balance of power by prohibiting the use of scabs!

By allowing the offshoring of jobs, the government favours company management at the expense of workers, notably due to the absence of anti-scab provisions in the Canada Labour Code. Since telecom companies are under federal jurisdiction, labour relations in this industry are governed by this Labour Code. The result is an unequal balance of power in this economic sector, since employers can transfer work overseas during a strike or lockout with no possibility for the unions to oppose or challenge this practice. We have to restore the balance of power by prohibiting the use of scabs!

By allowing the offshoring of jobs, the government favours company management at the expense of workers, notably due to the absence of anti-scab provisions in the Canada Labour Code. Since telecom companies are under federal jurisdiction, labour relations in this industry are governed by this Labour Code. The result is an unequal balance of power in this economic sector, since employers can transfer work overseas during a strike or lockout with no possibility for the unions to oppose or challenge this practice. We have to restore the balance of power by prohibiting the use of scabs!

Let’s send a clear message

Let’s send a clear message

Let’s send a clear message

Let’s send a clear message

Let’s send a clear message

With a single click, we can send a clear message to the Government of Canada. Let’s tell the government to take immediate action to ensure that our data and jobs are kept here in Canada. Please support our campaign by completing the form below.

With a single click, we can send a clear message to the Government of Canada. Let’s tell the government to take immediate action to ensure that our data and jobs are kept here in Canada. Please support our campaign by completing the form below.

With a single click, we can send a clear message to the Government of Canada. Let’s tell the government to take immediate action to ensure that our data and jobs are kept here in Canada. Please support our campaign by completing the form below.

With a single click, we can send a clear message to the Government of Canada. Let’s tell the government to take immediate action to ensure that our data and jobs are kept here in Canada. Please support our campaign by completing the form below.

With a single click, we can send a clear message to the Government of Canada. Let’s tell the government to take immediate action to ensure that our data and jobs are kept here in Canada. Please support our campaign by completing the form below.

Participate

Let’s send a clear message: Keep our telecom services local and secure!

Participate

Let’s send a clear message: Keep our telecom services local and secure!

Participate

Let’s send a clear message: Keep our telecom services local and secure!

Participate

Let’s send a clear message: Keep our telecom services local and secure!

Participate

Let’s send a clear message: Keep our telecom services local and secure!


Dear Minister,
I am writing to you because I am concerned about the outsourcing of well-paying telecom jobs to countries with less favourable working conditions than here. This practice hurts our economy and our ability to negotiate working conditions in this industry, in addition to putting our personal information at risk.
I strongly disapprove of the offshoring of jobs by large, highly profitable Canadian telecommunication companies that receive substantial subsidies. Since 2015, for broadband deployment alone, the federal government has announced investments of nearly $6.5 billion, which have served to directly fund the infrastructure of these companies in regions that remain underserved. This is in addition to investments by the various provincial governments and the $2 billion in preferential loans offered by the Canada Infrastructure Bank. All of this public funding is aimed at achieving a key goal: connecting the entire population to high-speed Internet, a service on which we all depend more than ever.
I wonder, however, why the Canadian companies that receive all this money are allowed to harm our economy by outsourcing jobs overseas? Not to mention the fact that the work is outsourced to countries where wages are lower and no taxes are paid in Canada.
I believe that telecommunication jobs should stay in Canada unless the company can prove there is a labour shortage that is confirmed by the government. There is nothing extraordinary about such a procedure, as it is already required of Canadian companies wishing to hire temporary foreign workers.
I also believe that the federal government should reconsider its position on the integration of anti-scab provisions in the Canada Labour Code. The absence of this protection, combined with the possibility for companies to outsource work beyond our borders, shifts the balance of power substantially in favour of employers during collective bargaining. Quebec and BC laws have long prohibited scabs. It’s time for the federal government to catch up!
Finally, I am worried about the protection of my personal information now that a significant portion of the telecommunications companies’ customer service and technical departments is located abroad. Where is my personal information currently hosted? Who is protecting it and under what laws? Canadian law or the law of the country where the Canadian service provider’s subcontractor is located? While Canadian laws may not be perfect, they offer better protection of personal information than certain countries where the telecommunications companies’ call centres are located. We need better protection!
I therefore join with CUPE Quebec and Unifor Quebec in their campaign calling on the federal government to:


Dear Minister,
I am writing to you because I am concerned about the outsourcing of well-paying telecom jobs to countries with less favourable working conditions than here. This practice hurts our economy and our ability to negotiate working conditions in this industry, in addition to putting our personal information at risk.

I strongly disapprove of the offshoring of jobs by large, highly profitable Canadian telecommunication companies that receive substantial subsidies. Since 2015, for broadband deployment alone, the federal government has announced investments of nearly $6.5 billion, which have served to directly fund the infrastructure of these companies in regions that remain underserved. This is in addition to investments by the various provincial governments and the $2 billion in preferential loans offered by the Canada Infrastructure Bank. All of this public funding is aimed at achieving a key goal: connecting the entire population to high-speed Internet, a service on which we all depend more than ever.

I wonder, however, why the Canadian companies that receive all this money are allowed to harm our economy by outsourcing jobs overseas? Not to mention the fact that the work is outsourced to countries where wages are lower and no taxes are paid in Canada.

I believe that telecommunication jobs should stay in Canada unless the company can prove there is a labour shortage that is confirmed by the government. There is nothing extraordinary about such a procedure, as it is already required of Canadian companies wishing to hire temporary foreign workers.

I also believe that the federal government should reconsider its position on the integration of anti-scab provisions in the Canada Labour Code. The absence of this protection, combined with the possibility for companies to outsource work beyond our borders, shifts the balance of power substantially in favour of employers during collective bargaining. Quebec and BC laws have long prohibited scabs. It’s time for the federal government to catch up!

Finally, I am worried about the protection of my personal information now that a significant portion of the telecommunications companies’ customer service and technical departments is located abroad. Where is my personal information currently hosted? Who is protecting it and under what laws? Canadian law or the law of the country where the Canadian service provider’s subcontractor is located? While Canadian laws may not be perfect, they offer better protection of personal information than certain countries where the telecommunications companies’ call centres are located. We need better protection!

I therefore join with CUPE Quebec and Unifor Quebec in their campaign calling on the federal government to:


Dear Minister,
I am writing to you because I am concerned about the outsourcing of well-paying telecom jobs to countries with less favourable working conditions than here. This practice hurts our economy and our ability to negotiate working conditions in this industry, in addition to putting our personal information at risk.
I strongly disapprove of the offshoring of jobs by large, highly profitable Canadian telecommunication companies that receive substantial subsidies. Since 2015, for broadband deployment alone, the federal government has announced investments of nearly $6.5 billion, which have served to directly fund the infrastructure of these companies in regions that remain underserved. This is in addition to investments by the various provincial governments and the $2 billion in preferential loans offered by the Canada Infrastructure Bank. All of this public funding is aimed at achieving a key goal: connecting the entire population to high-speed Internet, a service on which we all depend more than ever.
I wonder, however, why the Canadian companies that receive all this money are allowed to harm our economy by outsourcing jobs overseas? Not to mention the fact that the work is outsourced to countries where wages are lower and no taxes are paid in Canada.
I believe that telecommunication jobs should stay in Canada unless the company can prove there is a labour shortage that is confirmed by the government. There is nothing extraordinary about such a procedure, as it is already required of Canadian companies wishing to hire temporary foreign workers.
I also believe that the federal government should reconsider its position on the integration of anti-scab provisions in the Canada Labour Code. The absence of this protection, combined with the possibility for companies to outsource work beyond our borders, shifts the balance of power substantially in favour of employers during collective bargaining. Quebec and BC laws have long prohibited scabs. It’s time for the federal government to catch up!
Finally, I am worried about the protection of my personal information now that a significant portion of the telecommunications companies’ customer service and technical departments is located abroad. Where is my personal information currently hosted? Who is protecting it and under what laws? Canadian law or the law of the country where the Canadian service provider’s subcontractor is located? While Canadian laws may not be perfect, they offer better protection of personal information than certain countries where the telecommunications companies’ call centres are located. We need better protection!
I therefore join with CUPE Quebec and Unifor Quebec in their campaign calling on the federal government to:

Dear Minister,
I am writing to you because I am concerned about the outsourcing of well-paying telecom jobs to countries with less favourable working conditions than here. This practice hurts our economy and our ability to negotiate working conditions in this industry, in addition to putting our personal information at risk.

I strongly disapprove of the offshoring of jobs by large, highly profitable Canadian telecommunication companies that receive substantial subsidies. Since 2015, for broadband deployment alone, the federal government has announced investments of nearly $6.5 billion, which have served to directly fund the infrastructure of these companies in regions that remain underserved. This is in addition to investments by the various provincial governments and the $2 billion in preferential loans offered by the Canada Infrastructure Bank. All of this public funding is aimed at achieving a key goal: connecting the entire population to high-speed Internet, a service on which we all depend more than ever.

I wonder, however, why the Canadian companies that receive all this money are allowed to harm our economy by outsourcing jobs overseas? Not to mention the fact that the work is outsourced to countries where wages are lower and no taxes are paid in Canada.

I believe that telecommunication jobs should stay in Canada unless the company can prove there is a labour shortage that is confirmed by the government. There is nothing extraordinary about such a procedure, as it is already required of Canadian companies wishing to hire temporary foreign workers.

I also believe that the federal government should reconsider its position on the integration of anti-scab provisions in the Canada Labour Code. The absence of this protection, combined with the possibility for companies to outsource work beyond our borders, shifts the balance of power substantially in favour of employers during collective bargaining. Quebec and BC laws have long prohibited scabs. It’s time for the federal government to catch up!

Finally, I am worried about the protection of my personal information now that a significant portion of the telecommunications companies’ customer service and technical departments is located abroad. Where is my personal information currently hosted? Who is protecting it and under what laws? Canadian law or the law of the country where the Canadian service provider’s subcontractor is located? While Canadian laws may not be perfect, they offer better protection of personal information than certain countries where the telecommunications companies’ call centres are located. We need better protection!

I therefore join with CUPE Quebec and Unifor Quebec in their campaign calling on the federal government to:


Dear Minister,

I am writing to you because I am concerned about the outsourcing of well-paying telecom jobs to countries with less favourable working conditions than here. This practice hurts our economy and our ability to negotiate working conditions in this industry, in addition to putting our personal information at risk.

I strongly disapprove of the offshoring of jobs by large, highly profitable Canadian telecommunication companies that receive substantial subsidies. Since 2015, for broadband deployment alone, the federal government has announced investments of nearly $6.5 billion, which have served to directly fund the infrastructure of these companies in regions that remain underserved. This is in addition to investments by the various provincial governments and the $2 billion in preferential loans offered by the Canada Infrastructure Bank. All of this public funding is aimed at achieving a key goal: connecting the entire population to high-speed Internet, a service on which we all depend more than ever.

I wonder, however, why the Canadian companies that receive all this money are allowed to harm our economy by outsourcing jobs overseas? Not to mention the fact that the work is outsourced to countries where wages are lower and no taxes are paid in Canada.

I believe that telecommunication jobs should stay in Canada unless the company can prove there is a labour shortage that is confirmed by the government. There is nothing extraordinary about such a procedure, as it is already required of Canadian companies wishing to hire temporary foreign workers.

I also believe that the federal government should reconsider its position on the integration of anti-scab provisions in the Canada Labour Code. The absence of this protection, combined with the possibility for companies to outsource work beyond our borders, shifts the balance of power substantially in favour of employers during collective bargaining. Quebec and BC laws have long prohibited scabs. It’s time for the federal government to catch up!

Finally, I am worried about the protection of my personal information now that a significant portion of the telecommunications companies’ customer service and technical departments is located abroad. Where is my personal information currently hosted? Who is protecting it and under what laws? Canadian law or the law of the country where the Canadian service provider’s subcontractor is located? While Canadian laws may not be perfect, they offer better protection of personal information than certain countries where the telecommunications companies’ call centres are located. We need better protection!

I therefore join with CUPE Quebec and Unifor Quebec in their campaign calling on the federal government to:

  • Prohibit or severely restrict the outsourcing of telecommunication jobs abroad
  • Add anti-scab provisions to the Canada Labour Code
  • Put the protection of personal data ahead of commercial interests in its reform of privacy legislation
  • Prohibit or severely restrict the outsourcing of telecommunication jobs abroad
  • Add anti-scab provisions to the Canada Labour Code
  • Put the protection of personal data ahead of commercial interests in its reform of privacy legislation
  • Prohibit or severely restrict the outsourcing of telecommunication jobs abroad
  • Add anti-scab provisions to the Canada Labour Code;
  • Put the protection of personal data ahead of commercial interests in its reform of privacy legislation
  • Prohibit or severely restrict the outsourcing of telecommunication jobs abroad
  • Add anti-scab provisions to the Canada Labour Code
  • Put the protection of personal data ahead of commercial interests in its reform of privacy legislation
  • Prohibit or severely restrict the outsourcing of telecommunication jobs abroad
  • Add anti-scab provisions to the Canada Labour Code
  • Put the protection of personal data ahead of commercial interests in its reform of privacy legislation
Thank you Minister for your time and attention on this matter.
Thank you Minister for your time and attention on this matter.
Thank you Minister for your time and attention on this matter.
Thank you Minister for your time and attention on this matter.
Thank you Minister for your time and attention on this matter.

By completing this short form, you can send this campaign letter directly to the ministers responsible.

By completing this short form, you can send this campaign letter directly to the ministers responsible.

By completing this short form, you can send this campaign letter directly to the ministers responsible.

By completing this short form, you can send this campaign letter directly to the ministers responsible.

By completing this short form, you can send this campaign letter directly to the ministers responsible.

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© 2021 — Canadian Union of Public Employees
© 2021 — Canadian Union of Public Employees
© 2021 — Canadian Union of Public Employees
© 2021 — Canadian Union of Public Employees
© 2021 — Canadian Union of Public Employees